bouquet of clumsy words,
busket:

i wish the devil would have taught me all this and i wouldn’t have to pay for college

busket:

i wish the devil would have taught me all this and i wouldn’t have to pay for college

flatsound:

i wanna feel how dogs feel when you let them go in a big field 

deemasworld:

 

ALL HAIL THE GLOW CLOUD.

deemasworld:

 

ALL HAIL THE GLOW CLOUD.

mausspace:

fuck summer i want it to be dark and misty and frigid and october

Foggy nights and pumpkin carving and walking through Forest Park at night along the abandoned train tracks. Yeah, that sounds fucking perfect.

haemus:

by locaburg
on-this-day-in-crime:

July 30, 2012 - James Holmes is formally charged with 24 counts of murder, two for each of the 12 murdered victims, and 116 counts of attempted murder in relation to the shooting in Aurora, Colorado.

on-this-day-in-crime:

July 30, 2012 - James Holmes is formally charged with 24 counts of murder, two for each of the 12 murdered victims, and 116 counts of attempted murder in relation to the shooting in Aurora, Colorado.

scumkill:

she loves flowers

People are just as wonderful as sunsets if you let them be. When I look at a sunset, I don’t find myself saying, “Soften the orange a bit on the right hand corner.” I don’t try to control a sunset. I watch with awe as it unfolds.
Carl R. Rogers (via intheflowersss)

dichotomized:

In 1867, an 8-year-old girl named Fanny Adams was found by horrified villagers in the following pieces:

Her bloody head, stuck on a hop-pole with the eyes gouged out and one hear tore off.

Her chest, severed at the diaphragm, with the heart scooped out.

Her arms, deposited separately, with two copper pence pieces clutched in one hand.

One foot, dropped in a field of clover.

Her eyes, recovered from the nearby River Wey.

Her heart, lying on it’s own.

It is assumed the river had taken all other remains. The man responsible was solicitor’s clerk Frederick Baker. He used his tea-break on a Saturday in August to walk through the meadows near the hop-field, and finding Fanny Adams playing with two friends. He gave the two girls half pence to run races for him; then sent the other two home while he took Fanny to the hop-field. He then battered the child with a large stone, and then cut her apart with his pen-knife. After which he went and had some beer and returned to his office where he wrote in his diary: “Killed a young girl. It was fine and hot,” He was unable to explain bloodstains on his cuffs. He was hanged at Winchester.